Overview

Tweet. Tweet.

    follow me on Twitter

    « The three pillars of success in (nearly) any agency | Main | Can brands be funny enough? (Or: Beat the meat) »

    June 14, 2007

    TrackBack

    TrackBack URL for this entry:
    http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341d03da53ef00e008c5915e8834

    Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Where are all the women?:

    Comments

    Kelly

    Why aren't more women in higher positions? Because men are in control of putting them there. I am currently the only female creative at the agency and my boss has told me he believes women can't make it in the industry. I've heard him also refer to a woman who was pursueing a promotion as stuck, because she will never go anywhere in the mans world. When she did get it, he called her underqualified and manipulative. It's sad really, you start you career as a intelligent, confident and talented woman and from that point on you're beaten down and convienced you will always be second best, regardless of the work you do. I was also in the room when a new (male) junior creative was hired, he was given the same salary as me after three years here. I was told that when I compare my salaries to others, I should consider sex. I still cant' figure out why that means anything. So, I have two questions for you. What agency do you work for and do you need a good writer?

    Mk Descodificado

    Couldn't agree more with you. Great post.

    UnluckyCat

    Where are all the women? Well, they're routinely overlooked and systematically held back until they find a new position in a new company where they can actually USE their skills.

    Least that's was the case in all the agencies I worked for.

    brandie stephan

    Yes, not having enough female leadership on a marketing team leads to terrible commercials like this one for an at home pregnancy test. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqX7VxW3wL0

    You can just picture all the men in the boardroom laughing and giving each other high-fives, the women are cringing from the bathroom humor.

    neilperkin

    I'm a rarity in that I work in an environment (magazine publishing) where the majority of senior staff are female. My view:
    1. Yes
    2. Definitely, yes
    3. Don't know

    Good point and a good post

    Gitti

    I've asked myself, and others, that same question. In my country, the Dominican Republic, you rarely see women in very senior positions, except in client service departments. I think, right now, I may be the only creative director (of course we're talking about a small market with, at most, 10 big agencies). It's true also that entry-level positions, in all areas, are flooded with women but they seem to fade away with the years. I have no answers just theories.

    Jamey Shiels

    Very interesting discussion.

    1. If the agency does their home work and truly tries to identify and understand the consumer, there shouldn't be a loss of understanding. Does that mean that's always the case, probably not. Look at some of the marketing that you see and it's obvious more is lost than saved. The challenge is to the agency. To be a true partner to a client, we have to understand and know her, the consumer.

    2. Good agencies have good people regardless of gender. If you were to query companies in the market for an agency, the first two things they look to are your work and your peopl and their expertise and proven skills. Our new business VP does an excellent job in presenting and engaging. Fact is she's a woman, but her skills are what gets the job done.

    3. I think Andy's point on #3 is true. Maybe not fair, but true. The pressure to find balance in career or family is unfair to women because of the worldview at this time.

    Thanks for generating an interesting conversation.

    Jamey Shiels

    Very interesting discussion.

    1. If the agency does their home work and truly tries to identify and understand the consumer, there shouldn't be a loss of understanding. Does that mean that's always the case, probably not. Look at some of the marketing that you see and it's obvious more is lost than saved. The challenge is to the agency. To be a true partner to a client, we have to understand and know her, the consumer.

    2. Good agencies have good people regardless of gender. If you were to query companies in the market for an agency, the first two things they look to are your work and your peopl and their expertise and proven skills. Our new business VP does an excellent job in presenting and engaging. Fact is she's a woman, but her skills are what gets the job done.

    3. I think Andy's point on #3 is true. Maybe not fair, but true. The pressure to find balance in career or family is unfair to women because of the worldview at this time.

    Thanks for generating an interesting conversation.

    Andy Didyk

    Great topic. Here are my thoughts:

    1. Absolutely something is lost, but the impact of that depends of the ultimate business objectives of the campaign. If you have solid data that suggests that a particular product is primarily purchased by / influenced by women, as opposed to a generalization that most products are, you can bet that I would purposefully seek out women to be on my team for that initiative.

    2. There is a business advantage for any agency that has talented people in their leadership positions. As far as gender-specific advantages are concerned, I'm not convinced that simply by adding someone of a particular gender to a leadership team that an advantage is automatically gained. I know plenty of smart people (of both genders) who come up with brilliant marketing campaigns because they've done research and can think on their feet, even if they themselves don't belong to the target audience. That being said, it's necessary to gain the perspective of that audience regardless of leadership.

    3. Where have all of the women gone? Well, I'm not a woman, but I have talked to many who fall into the critiera you listed for the "typical consumer". My thought would be that in addition to the unfortunate, lingering fallout of the male-dominated business era, women today face a crisis of identity that is difficult to overcome. Traditional values still hold sway with many, while progress in the women's movement (while fantastic and very good overall) seems to pull in opposite directions at times. Stay at home, or career? Assertive or empathetic? Climb to the top of the ladder, or keep life balanced to enjoy family and work? Trying to do it all seems like a difficult position to put oneself in (like taking on two full-time jobs and expecting to be good at both).

    Please don't read anything misogynistic into these thoughts...I'm merely taking a stab at answering your very pertinent question. The previous agency I worked at had a 50/50 male to female ratio, and it was very successful and a great place to work. I'm interested to see what others think about his issue.

    anthony barbuto

    To learn what the college age demographic wants attend College Power 2007, a conference that will give you gorilla marketing ideas that reach this affluent but hard to contact demographic. This conference will teach you how to work with the cooperation of the College Administrators who are LOOKING for quality products and services to bring to their campus,......many times on an exclusive basis. Some of the companeis following this ad model are on 2000-4500 school campuses enjoying teh college business!!!!...Contact me as seating is limited for College Power 2007.....Anthony Barbuto, delegate manager, 646 253 5514.....[email protected]

    The comments to this entry are closed.

    Subscribe

    Your email address:


    Powered by FeedBlitz

    Look for me here, too

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button
    Blog powered by Typepad
    Member since 03/2004